“The Rag-Tag Circus”

World War II: The 83rd “Thunderbolt” Division of the U. S. Army Infantry crossed the English Channel to Normandy in June 1944. It fought through the Hedgerows, across France and into Germany, including the Battle of the Bulge. In March 1945, the 83rd received orders to turn east and race toward Berlin. The 83rd had […]

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Police Story: 3 AM on the Harbor Freeway

This is a favorite police story I have to share. It takes place on the Harbor Freeway in the Los Angeles area. Here’s how the officer tells it:   I stopped a guy for driving erratically on the Harbor freeway at 3:30 in the morning. The conversation went like this: He: “Do you know who […]

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Brave Texas Cook Is Pearl Harbor Hero

Doris Miller, known as “Dorie” to shipmates and friends, was born in Waco, Texas  in October 1919. He helped his parents and three brothers around the house by cooking meals and doing laundry, as well as working on the family farm. Miller was a good student and a fullback on the football team at Waco’s […]

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“Our Arrows Will Block Out The Sun”

The ancient Spartans have given us some of the greatest lines in military history. Persian King Xerxes was trying to fight his way into Greece 2500 years ago during the Battle of Thermopylae (480 BC), one of the most famous battles in history . Spartan King Leonidas, along with a few thousand guys, was doing […]

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“Goodnight Chesty Puller, Wherever You Are!”

In his thirty-seven years of service to the United States Marine Corps, Lewis Puller, nicknamed “Chesty,” would rise through the ranks from Private to General,  and become the most decorated Marine in American history. How does a guy get a nickname like “Chesty”? It is said that he had perfect posture and his torso resembled […]

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Teenage Heroine: Emily Geiger

Even in the 1700’s women could be patriots and heroines. There are numerous accounts of brave women who nobly and courageously performed their patriotic duty during the American Revolution. Here is the story of one such woman of South Carolina, Emily Geiger. General Nathaniel Greene had retreated before Lord Rawdon who had divided his forces.. […]

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“Don’t Tread on Me”

In 1751 Benjamin Franklin wrote a commentary in his Pennsylvania Gazette suggesting a way to thank the Brits for their policy of sending convicted felons to America – the colonists should send rattlesnakes to England! Three years later, Franklin created and published the first known political cartoon in an American newspaper. It was the image […]

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N U T S !

Four German soldiers approached American lines at Bastogne, Belgium in December 22, 1944. Major Wagner of the 47th Panzer Corps was coming to deliver a typed message demanding American surrender. The message, as you can imagine, was not too polite. Among other things, it pointed out that the Americans were surrounded, and included these words: […]

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Blizzard of 1780: “Buried like sheep in the snow…”

Most Americans think about the fight for independence and sacrifices made by our Founders on the 4th of July. It’s summertime and the weather is usually hot while we are vacationing and visiting Independence Hall or Boston. But the story of the American Revolution is best told in the freezing days of winter. “The oldest […]

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You Can’t Make This Stuff Up

Lieutenant “Jack” Lee had a reputation as a fearless and aggressive leader who had led his tank company through France, Germany and Austria. Lee was described as “bright and inquisitive” young man who was a star football player and an avid cavalry rider. These skills helped him gain an exceptional talent for maneuvering Sherman tanks. […]

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