Secession in New York

The story goes that in 1861 the hamlet of Town Line decided to secede from the Union, by a vote of 85 to 40. It wasn’t until 1946 that another vote was held about rejoining the United States. This time there were 90 votes to rejoin the Union. But 23 Rebels were still holding out […]

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The First American Battle in Korea – in 1871.

The Korean War took place between 1950 and 1953. But it may surprise you to know almost 80 years before that American Sailors and Marines fought in Korea.  It has been virtually forgotten, but it was the very first U.S. military action within the country. But no history should be forgotten. The ruling Joseon dynasty, not fond […]

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A Rebel General in a Yankee Army

“Fightin’ Joe” Wheeler has the distinction of serving as both a Confederate General in the Civil War, and later as a U.S. Army General. That’s him in the photo, in front of the others. Joseph Wheeler graduated from West Point in 1859. After completing Cavalry School, he was posted to Fort Craig in New Mexico Territory. […]

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“When that pack of demons swept forward…”

Sergeant Major Edward Baker was born in a frontier wagon in 1865, while his parents were on the Oregon Trail. At age 17, he joined one of the toughest, battle-hardened units in the U.S. Army: the 10th Cavalry. The men of the 10th were known as Buffalo Soldiers, African-Americans up through the NCO ranks. Baker […]

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Blow the Bridge or Die!

On Easter Sunday morning 1972, Marine Corps Captain John Ripley was in a South Vietnamese village. He was there to help train 600 South Vietnamese Marines. But no one was thinking about that now. An enemy armored division had appeared on the other side of the river. Two hundred tanks and 20,000 men were assembling […]

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“He was fearless”

Omaha Beach was a bloodbath of WWII. Surrounded by steep cliffs, it was heavily defended. Aerial bombardment did little damage to the defensive fortifications. Rough surf was hard on the landing craft, and only two of 29 tanks managed to reach shore. John Spalding was in command of a 32-man platoon at the spearhead. He […]

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Washington Calls to Arms “…a standing miracle”

Born a British citizen and a former Redcoat, George Washington had, by the 1770s, joined the growing ranks of colonists who were dismayed by Britain’s exploitative policies in North America. In 1774, Washington joined the Continental Congress as a delegate from Virginia. State representatives of the Continental Congress did not really want a national army, […]

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How A Sub Sank A Train

USS Barb has been called a “Pacific killer sub par excellence.” Here’s some of the story. The USS Barb was on its last war patrol. She and her crew had served six patrols in the European Theater, and had been in the Pacific for 19 months. The Barb racked up one of the most outstanding […]

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“Pied Piper of Saipan” Takes 1500 Prisoners

The battle for the island of Saipan in 1944 was brutal, but the ingenuity and courage of one Marine saved a lot of lives on both sides. Guy Gabaldon grew up in poverty on the streets of East Los Angeles. Knowing how to live by his wits, he shined shoes at age 10 to help […]

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